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search-engine-better-than-google-indian-kidSPR: A sixteen-year-old Canadian kid of Indian-origin, Anmol Tukrel, has developed a personalized search engine. He claims it to be 47% more accurate than Google search results, and 21% more accurate on an average.
Google is hands down the big daddy of search engines and twines in itself the definition of world wide web. Google has been challenged time and again in its search supremacy, most recently rumored by Apple Inc. Competition is always expected in the tech industry, but Google’s search algorithm getting challenged by a 16-year-old Indian origin kid is unprecedented.
Anmol Tukrel is like any other regular teenager who had just passed his tenth grade, except that he is now challenging Google’s authority. In a matter of few months and approximately 60 hours of coding, Anmol, who is an Indian origin Canadian citizen, has designed a personalized search engine claiming it to be 47% more accurate than the Google Search, and about 21% more accurate on an average.
While talking to The Times of India Anmol said:
I thought I would do something in the personalized search space. It was the most genius thing ever. But when I realized Google already does it, I tried taking it to the next level
Anmol started the project of personalized search engine as part of submission into Google Science Fair, a global online competition open to students age 13 to 18 years.
The accuracy of the search engine was tested to a limited search query of this year’s news articles from The New York Times. He compared the search results of his indigenous search engine with that of Google and the accuracy accordingly was well, above 47%. For all the skeptics, Anmol has put up a link to the test cases online for anyone to view.
The kid had a very basic developmental kit, a computer with at least 1 gigabyte of free storage space, a python-language development environment, a spreadsheet program and access to Google and New York Times.
Google has just announced Sundar Pichai, an Indian as its CEO, and now an Indian origin teen challenging the tech giant who had recently rebranded itself to Alphabet. Seems like the Silicon Valley has a mysterious affinity to the Indians.
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